Tagged: wellesley

Return of the expat

wells

Wellesley Magazine‘s spring issue carries an essay worthy of your attention. “Not All Here” is foreign correspondent Paula Butturini’s graceful pondering of the experience of returning to the United States after 32 years abroad in London, Madrid, London, Rome, Warsaw, Berlin, Rome, and Paris.

“Lucky you,” people often respond when they ask where we’ve lived. I’m always the first to agree. But I never know how to answer when they follow up with the inevitable, “What’s it like to be home?”

My gut response—a puzzled-sounding “Home?”—tends not to go down well. But the fact is I haven’t felt at home since we moved back, and didn’t expect I would.

Butturini returns to a country much changed.

Perhaps it’s the sea changes in American life that explain my unease. Who sent our factory jobs to the developing world while I was gone, our secretarial and administrative jobs to customers’ home computers? When did poisonous party politics replace public discourse? Who canonized a new class of oligarchs and decreed that stratospheric wealth was a heavenly nod from the Creator? When did public civility and civic obligation become quaint? How can white police shootings of young black men be back in the news, half a century after Selma—the march, not the movie?

I like this paragraph, too, and am in the author’s debt for introducing me to a German term I immediately embraced:

My husband suggests that we may be missing what the Germans call Idiotenfreiheit, or the freedom enjoyed by idiots, the insane, a freedom that can apply to foreigners as well. Foreigners living outside their home country often enjoy a large measure of psychological freedom; they may be treated much the same way a country treats its own citizens who are not quite “all there.”

Idiotenfreiheit indeed.

I’m all for more essays in university magazines. We’re the perfect place for them. And Wellesley did something else I like here, which was use four pages for a two-page essay. The first two pages are devoted to a graphic opener — illustration on first page, head and deck on the second, the essay text on pages three and four. Would like to see more of that.

 

UMag Inbox

cover_2 copyDigging through the tottering stack, your intrepid umagazinologist liked this cover very much, from Wellesley. So you know, that’s a red knot. (Go ahead and click the bird. You know you want to.)

Auburn Magazine had my favorite bio-in-the-deck, for profile subject Cynthia Hill: Walmart pharmacist and Peabody Award–winning filmmaker. Well, of course. One runs into those every day around here.

TCNJ Magazine from the College of New Jersey does a cool thing with their inside front cover and first page, a recurring bit called Up Front. A recent one reported the answers to the question, “What was your favorite campus concert?” and I will never understand Vanilla Ice outpolling Bruce Springsteen. That’s incomprehensible.

upfront

Nice piece from Pomona College Magazine about playwright George C. Wolfe’s contribution to the National Center for Civil and Human Rights in Atlanta. Writer Mark Wood opens this way:

Grab a stool at the old-fashioned lunch counter. Slip on a pair of earphones and press your palms to the hand outlines on the countertop. Close your eyes if you dare. A soothing Southern voice murmurs in your ear, “This your first time, right? So far, so good. You’ll be all right.” But then you hear the mob coming, surrounding you, jeering at you. “Git up!” A vicious jolt as if a ghost has kicked your stool. “If you don’t git up, boy, I’m gonna kill you.” The voice moves around you, so close you can almost feel the breath on your ear. Dishes shatter. Silverware jangles off walls. Sirens rise in the distance. Your stool is jostled again and again as the shouting engulfs you. “Kill him!” “Stomp his face!”

After 90 seconds, the chaos subsides, replaced by a woman’s voice: “What you’ve just experienced was created to honor the brave men and women who participated in the American civil rights sit-in movement.”

Playing on nostalgia for campus does not mapwork for everyone. For example, it is the rare Johns Hopkins University alumnus who looks back at his or her undergraduate years with a warm feeling of “those were the best four years of my life.” Hopkins just isn’t that sort of place. When Johns Hopkins Magazine tried to do a feature story on campus traditions in 2006, we had to scour every division and every campus and still came up so short we made up a few just to fill out the spread. All of which is a long intro to something clever in the Spring ’15 Oregon Quarterly, in which the magazine staff discovers campus plaques they’d never noticed until they starting looking for them, and explains the story behind them. They even lobby for a plaque that doesn’t exist, but ought to.

Coverage

On July 1, I became editor of Johns Hopkins Magazine. I was already deep into a complicated feature story on pain science, so the plan was for Catherine Pierre, who was promoted to interim communications director, to co-edit the forthcoming issue with me. But Catherine had to step right up to her new duties, which meant I was on my own finishing the magazine. So time for blogging has been in short supply.

Today, though, there’s an interlude before I have to start writing captions and heads and cover lines. Speaking of  . . .

A batch of striking covers have appeared in my mailbox in the last month. First up, great minds think alike:

car   wellesley

The Carolina Alumni Review cover is for a special food issue, which includes recipes from alumni cooks. As a resident of Baltimore, I must take exception to Robert Stehling’s recipe for crab cakes. It calls for diced bread. You do not, under any circumstances, sir, put filler like bread in a crab cake. That sort of thing will get you in trouble in Baltimore.

In addition to our customizable making customer service, we present enhancing and proofreading facilities. Even if you invest in a study paper, enticing essay, useful essay, as well as other writing bit, we comprise of highlights that show we value your educational reputation with custom essay writing service write my paper http://writemyessaysclub.com . Our college or university old fashioned paper coming up with website generates newspapers that fulfill the tightest due dates with custom essay writing service

Next . . . excuse me, but your cover is dripping:

stanford   holyoke   texas

The Alcalde cover story gets that magazine’s digital multimedia treatment, which is starting to make me jealous.

Finally, there’s this one. Just because it’s so pretty:

ndsu

 

More to come in the days ahead, because how much work could this new editor gig be?

Now you know (second of a series)

Things I know now because I read alumni magazines:

— In a University of Minnesota study, pasting pictures of vegetables in the compartments of school cafeteria lunch trays resulted in twice as many kids eating green beans. Consumption of carrots tripled. Oh, and astronauts on prolonged space flights lose weight in part because they just don’t eat enough while in orbit. (From “Serving Up Good News About Food,” Greg Breining, Reach from the University of Minnesota College of Liberal Arts)

— Title IX, the piece of legislation that forced colleges and universities to provide equal access to intercollegiate sports for men and women, is composed of 37 words. “Sports,” “athletics,” and “women” are not among them. (From “In the Wake of Title IX,” Melissa Ludtke, Wellesley)

— Beloit College holds an annual theme party called Bizarro Beloit, in which students dress up as another Beloit person of their choosing. Me, I’d come dressed as one of those squirrels, but I bet it’s been done. (From “Incomplete Glossary of Beloitisms,” Beloit College Magazine)

— There is such a thing as a vegan doughnut. Apparently, that means they are made without benefit of eggs or milk, in this case by Dun-Well Doughnuts, founded by a couple of Ithaca College grads. The New York Daily News says Dun-Well makes the best doughnuts in New York City, and co-founder Dan Dunbar says it took he and his partner a while to perfect the recipe. When he dropped their first try at workable dough into the deep fryer, it sank to the bottom and did not pop to the surface for 40 minutes. I bet that one was good. (From “A Business Made from Scratch,” Robin Roger, IC View)